Work Culture World Tour:
Austria

work culture world tour AustriaIt’s no wonder this nation brought forth the highly caffeinated energy drink Red Bull, given its longer than usual work week for the region (45 hours) combined with a landscape that is mostly Alps (62% of it). Welcome to Austria, home of musical geniuses we only need refer to by one name, like Mozart and Strauss, or tech geniuses – like Porsche and Mach, or Hollywood icons, like Ahhhhnooold.  But be careful about using first names here—they’re for kids and close friends only. Formality and punctuality are king in this coffee-loving land, and so are politeness, pork, winter sports and never ever using German words for a whole bunch of things. (Austrian Deutsch is a must instead). Germans say “tomaten,” but Austrians say “paradeiser,” for example.

Austria is the 21st destination on our ’round-the-world video curation tour of work cultures in many nations. We invite you to join us, watch out for us on our social channels (#CultureCoordinates) and let us know what these videos get right-or don’t-about working in different countries.

No loud talk, even-numbered bouquets or eating until host green-lights it…

…get ready for blunt feedback and business hierarchy

Fast Culture Facts for Austria

 Population:

  • 9 million, with a relatively low population density of 104 people per square kilometer, making it the 75thmost densely populated nation on Earth.

Employment:

  •  3.8 million – with a labor force participation rate of 61.3%, slightly less that of the U.S. Women make up 46.6% of the workforce.

Economy:

  • Austria’s GDP was $455.7 billion in 2018, making it the world’s 26st largest economy. Services make up about 70 percent of GDP, followed by industry, at 28 percent and agriculture, at around 1 percent.

Workforce Diversity:

  • Austria ranks 34th of 158 nations in terms of gender equality. Women earn about 84% of what men earn for similar work, one of the largest gaps in OECD nations. Austria’s has a small ethnic minorities of Turks (around 2%), Serbs and federal Germans (around 3%). It has a history of welcoming refugees, though now, like other European nations, far right parties want to close borders to ethnic minorities. Gay marriage and homosexuality are legal in Austria, although employment discrimination bans only cover sexual orientation, and not gender identity.

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