Work Culture World Tour:
Chile

The world’s largest pool in the world’s longest country – what more could you want from this South American nation? Well, if you want fries with that, you couldn’t have them without Chile, the cradle of the world’s potatoes. Tasty tubers aside, Chile is also home to an enormous stretch of coastline to the west, the Andes mountains to the east, and a desert so dry it’s almost Martian. An economic leader on the continent, Chile has a more formal business culture than many of its Latin American neighbors, but you can still expect some warm, kissy greetings and late arrivals to meetings.

Chile is the 22nd destination on our ’round-the-world video curation tour of work cultures in many nations. We invite you to join us, watch out for us on our social channels (#CultureCoordinates) and let us know what these videos get right-or don’t-about working in different countries.

So many hand gestures to avoid, as well as “summer” meetings in Jan-Feb…

…Rules are valued over relationships – and pedestrians over cars

Fast Culture Facts for Chile

 Population:

  • 19 million, with a sparse population density of 24 people per square kilometer, due to much of the nation’s people-unfriendly geography–very high mountains and very dry deserts. Its capitol city, Santiago, on the other hand, has the most densely populated city in the region – with 8,470 people per square km.

Employment:

  •  8.5 million – with a labor force participation rate of 59.2%, slightly less that of the U.S. Women make up 41.8% of the workforce.

Economy:

  • Chile’s GDP was $298.2 billion in 2018, the 4th largest in South America, and 43st largest economy in the world. Services make up 63 percent of GDP, followed by industry, at 33 percent and agriculture, at around 4 percent.

Workforce Diversity:

  • Chile ranks 57th of 158 nations in terms of gender equality. Women earn about 79% of what men earn for similar work, but that number dips to around 60% for women with higher education degrees. Besides this gender disparity, Chile has serious issues with income inequality, and that has led to recent unrest in the nation. Chile, whose population is mostly made up of European descent, also has come under fire for its discrimination against indigenous people, who are also protesting treatment by the government. Gay marriage and homosexuality are legal in Chile, and employment and housing discrimination are banned, but the country still prevents gay couples from adopting children.

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